How reporters spin – First article was edited replacement of second

The National Media Museum Bradford Exhibition shows that all newspaper photos are manipulated to create a narrative, so it stands to reason that the stories are often spun. So that 2 completely articl scan come from the same set of notes. Here are 3 examples.

e.g. 1 The Farmers Weekly article Flindt mentioned I found originally had a totally different title and therefore spin

“How 1 acre of land can earn farmers up to £60,000/year” How to get a good deal on farmland for backup power sites

e.g. 2 TOMO’s PA story concern
Now Look at this story and see how it also comes in two different versions. It almost looks like the PR guy at the renewables association had taken a redpen and re-arranged the article. The first few papragraphs are completely different but the latter ones are the same.

Plan to stop solar subsidies ‘absolutely nonsensical’ – green energy campaigners

Planned cuts to solar energy subsidies have been criticised as a “short sighted” move that will not lower energy bills.The Government has announced proposals to close the subsidies scheme a year early in April 2016 for “small-scale” solar farms, which can be up to 25 acres in size, to save up to £100 million a year by 2020.Changes have already been announced to close the subsidy scheme for the largest solar farms, above five megawatts (5MW), and for new onshore wind schemes.

Ministers are trying to grapple with a £1.5 billion overspend on the cap for subsidies to boost clean power by 2020, with spending expected to be £9.1 billion rather than the £7.6 billion limit.

The extra spending – due to changes in the wholesale price of power, more efficient technology such as wind turbines which generate more energy than expected and greater deployment of renewable schemes – is set to add an extra £18 to bills by 2020.

Consumers are already facing costs of around £92 on their energy bills by the end of the decade to pay for more low-carbon power, with the overspend pushing it to £110.

But the cuts to smaller solar farms will shave an estimated £1.20 off bills.

The Government’s assessment also shows it would push up carbon dioxide emissions by 7.3 million tonnes.

Officials said the plans, which also include curbs for biomass power plants, are needed to rein in rising bills and control spending.

There will also be a review of the scheme that pays householders for solar panels on their roofs later in the summer.

Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd said: “We need to keep bills as low as possible for hardworking families and businesses while reducing our emissions in the most cost-effective way.

 “Our support has driven down the cost of renewable energy significantly.

“As costs continue to fall it becomes easier for parts of the renewables industry to survive without subsidy.

“We’re taking action to protect consumers, while protecting existing investment.”

But critics said the proposals would put jobs at risk and undermine investment in renewables, while failing to reduce people’s energy bills.

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Daisy Sands, head of the energy campaign at Greenpeace said: “The proposals to stop solar subsidies that will save the average household about the same as a loaf of bread per year is absolutely nonsensical when comparing it to the 30,000 jobs and the investment in the UK economy that will be lost.

“This is a hugely short sighted proposal that will wipe out innovative community solar energy schemes but continue to pour money into subsidies and tax breaks for multinational energy giants like EDF.

“If the government is serious about keeping energy bills down, they would choose to slash subsidies and tax breaks for the oil, gas and nuclear corporations which have been propped up and polluting for decades.”

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Friends of the Earth energy campaigner Alasdair Cameron said: “This latest attack on the green economy will cast a long shadow over the UK solar industry, and undermine efforts to tackle climate change.

“This won’t lower electricity bills – all new energy is being subsidised to some extent and solar is already cheaper than nuclear and will soon be cheaper than gas from new power stations.”

Industry body the Solar Trade Association (STA) said the move would hit large rooftop schemes, which the Government has been keen to back, as well as solar farms.

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STA head of external affairs Leonie Greene said: “There is no pledge in the Conservative manifesto about cutting support for solar, so we are disappointed by this move.

“Solar is the nation’s most popular form of energy, as the Government’s own opinion polls have shown.”

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She called for more efforts to unlock the potential of rooftop solar, which only accounts for a small proportion of the market.

The Government also announced plans to extend the “levy control framework” cap on subsidies past the current end date of 2020/21 to give investors the certainty they have been asking for.

Cutting solar energy subsidies ‘will reduce household bills’
.

Solar energy subsidies will be cut under plans set out by Energy Secretary Amber Rudd which she claimed would reduce household bills. The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) is consulting on plans that would see subsidies for some small-scale new solar farms close by 2016.Ms Rudd said the renewable energy industry could not be given a “blank cheque” and the level of subsidies should be reduced because of a fall in the cost of delivering solar power.She launched a consultation proposing the early closure of the renewables obligation (RO) scheme for new solar projects generating less than five megawatts from April 2016.

Ms Rudd told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I’m not ruling out further subsidy for the solar industry. What we are doing today is introducing measures to limit that subsidy.

“We can’t have a situation where industry has a blank cheque and that cheque is paid for by people’s bills.

“I’m going to ensure that people’s bills are kept down in terms of this extra subsidy for renewable energy.”

The solar subsidies add around £3 to bills, she said: ” It all adds up doesn’t it? It’s £3 for solar then it comes to other sources as well. I’m going to make sure that those sums don’t keep adding up on to people’s bills.”

She added: “Bills having additional costs to them is never going to be painless. I welcome wholesale prices coming down, and bills coming down, but nevertheless we can’t have a system which we have had up to now where there is basically unlimited headroom for new renewables, including solar.

“Solar has been a great British success story and we will continue to support solar, but on a different level, on a capped level, so that I continue to look after bill payers’ interests as well. It’s getting that balance right.”

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Critics labelled the proposals short-sighted, putting jobs at risk and undermining investment in renewables at the same time as continuing to subsidise nuclear and fossil fuels.

Green Party MP Caroline Lucas said: “This proposed cut to support for solar is utterly short-sighted.

“While the Government continues to subsidise fossil fuels and nuclear, it’s undermining investor confidence in clean, renewable energy generation.

“This cut would further undermine Britain’s commitment to meeting our climate change targets and deepen our addiction to dirty fossil fuels.”

Daisy Sands, Greenpeace head of energy campaign, said: ” If the proposals to the consultation are implemented the Government will be choosing to protect subsidies to EDF whilst withdrawing support for the communities, businesses and households’ efforts to install solar panels.”

She said no one should be getting “easy money” at a time of financial stress, but a huge opportunity existed to deliver subsidy-free clean energy.

“Cutting the subsidies now will see businesses go bust and investment dry up. The timing couldn’t be worse as the sector is on transition to subsidy-free and is a cheap form of renewable energy.

“It is galling when tax breaks and subsidies have propped up the oil, gas and nuclear industries for decades.

“Jobs will go and emissions will stay higher at a time when policies and funding should be in place to ensure that people can participate in contributing to the UK’s diverse energy mix,” she said.

Friends of the Earth energy campaigner Alasdair Cameron said: ” This won’t lower electricity bills – all new energy is being subsidised to some extent and solar is already cheaper than nuclear and will soon be cheaper than gas from new power stations.

“This is entirely a problem of the Government’s creation. The Treasury has placed arbitrary limits on clean power, but solar has proved too popular and efficient, and the Government seems to lack the imagination to adapt.

“If David Cameron wants to have any credibility ahead of this year’s crucial climate talks, he must end his support for dirty fossil fuels, such as fracking, and stop his Government destroying the UK’s burgeoning renewable sector.”

Industry body the Solar Trade Association said the move, which affects bigger solar installations up to around 25 acres in size, would hit free-standing farms and larger rooftop schemes. It comes after the Government closed the subsidy scheme early for the largest solar farms of more than 5MW (megawatts) in size.

The Solar Trade Association’s head of external affairs Leonie Greene said: “This is damaging for big solar rooftops as well as solar farms, both very cost-effective ways of generating solar power.

This contrasts with repeated commitments from Government to boost the commercial solar rooftop market.

“The possible removal going forwards of the guarantee on a set level of support throughout a project’s lifetime once built is a real blow to investor confidence.”

She said: “There is no pledge in the Conservative manifesto about cutting support for solar, so we are disappointed by this move.

“Solar is the nation’s most popular form of energy, as the Government’s own opinion polls have shown.”

She called for more efforts to unlock the potential of rooftop solar, which only accounts for a small proportion of the market, and warned that if the Government pulled the rug from under solar farms too soon the market would have nowhere to go.

“We also regret this move because solar farms are close to competitiveness with new gas generation,” she said, adding solar subsidies only added £3 to household bills.


e.g. 3 The PA one is the direst and has no open comments

 Plan to stop solar subsidies ‘absolutely nonsensical’ – green energy campaigners
Press Association 2014 / Wednesday 22 July 2015 / News
Planned cuts to solar energy subsidies have been criticised as a “short sighted” move that will not lower energy bills.The Government has announced proposals to close the subsidies scheme a year early in April 2016 for “small-scale” solar farms, which can be up to 25 acres in size, to save up to £100 million a year by 2020.Changes have already been announced to close the subsidy scheme for the largest solar farms, above five megawatts (5MW), and for new onshore wind schemes.Ministers are trying to grapple with a £1.5 billion overspend on the cap for subsidies to boost clean power by 2020, with spending expected to be £9.1 billion rather than the £7.6 billion limit.

The extra spending – due to changes in the wholesale price of power, more efficient technology such as wind turbines which generate more energy than expected and greater deployment of renewable schemes – is set to add an extra £18 to bills by 2020.

Consumers are already facing costs of around £92 on their energy bills by the end of the decade to pay for more low-carbon power, with the overspend pushing it to £110.
But the cuts to smaller solar farms will shave an estimated £1.20 off bills.

The Government’s assessment also shows it would push up carbon dioxide emissions by 7.3 million tonnes.

Officials said the plans, which also include curbs for biomass power plants, are needed to rein in rising bills and control spending.

There will also be a review of the scheme that pays householders for solar panels on their roofs later in the summer.

Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd said: “We need to keep bills as low as possible for hardworking families and businesses while reducing our emissions in the most cost-effective way.

“Our support has driven down the cost of renewable energy significantly.

“As costs continue to fall it becomes easier for parts of the renewables industry to survive without subsidy.

“We’re taking action to protect consumers, while protecting existing investment.”

But critics said the proposals would put jobs at risk and undermine investment in renewables, while failing to reduce people’s energy bills.
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Daisy Sands, head of the energy campaign at Greenpeace said: “The proposals to stop solar subsidies that will save the average household about the same as a loaf of bread per year is absolutely nonsensical when comparing it to the 30,000 jobs and the investment in the UK economy that will be lost.

“This is a hugely short sighted proposal that will wipe out innovative community solar energy schemes but continue to pour money into subsidies and tax breaks for multinational energy giants like EDF.

“If the government is serious about keeping energy bills down, they would choose to slash subsidies and tax breaks for the oil, gas and nuclear corporations which have been propped up and polluting for decades.”

Friends of the Earth energy campaigner Alasdair Cameron said: “This latest attack on the green economy will cast a long shadow over the UK solar industry, and undermine efforts to tackle climate change.

“This won’t lower electricity bills – all new energy is being subsidised to some extent and solar is already cheaper than nuclear and will soon be cheaper than gas from new power stations.”

Industry body the Solar Trade Association (STA) said the move would hit large rooftop schemes, which the Government has been keen to back, as well as solar farms.

STA head of external affairs Leonie Greene said: “There is no pledge in the Conservative manifesto about cutting support for solar, so we are disappointed by this move.

“Solar is the nation’s most popular form of energy, as the Government’s own opinion polls have shown.”

She called for more efforts to unlock the potential of rooftop solar, which only accounts for a small proportion of the market.

“We also regret this move because solar farms are close to competitiveness with new gas generation,” she said, continuing that s olar subsidies added just £3 to household bills at the moment,

The Government also announced plans to extend the “levy control framework” cap on subsidies past the current end date of 2020/21 to give investors the certainty they have been asking for.

Tory Government pulls funding for Green Deal home efficiency programme

Press Association 2014 / Thursday 23 July 2015 / News
The Government’s flagship “Green Deal” home energy efficiency programme is to fold as ministers announced they were pulling its funding.The Department of Energy and Climate Change (Decc) said there would be no further funding for the Green Deal Finance Company, which delivers the programme, in light of low take-up and concerns about industry standards.There will also be no more funding for the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund cash back scheme, which gave households money back on home energy efficiency improvements.
Measures have been installed in around 10,000 properties under the Green Deal scheme, in which providers meet the upfront costs of installing efficiency measures and householders pay the money back from savings they make on their energy bills.Today’s announcement does not affect existing Green Deal plans taken out by householders or existing Green Deal Home Improvement Fund applications and vouchers, Decc said.

The end of the Green Deal is the latest announcement in a review of wider energy policies, which has already seen cuts to subsidies for smaller scale solar farms and onshore wind and a decision to ditch targets to make new homes “zero-carbon” by 2016.

The energy efficiency programme, which has been running for around two-and-a-half years, was last year labelled a “disappointing failure” by the Parliamentary Energy and Climate Change Committee.

Under the scheme, householders could avoid the upfront costs of insulation, efficient heating systems, draught proofing, double glazing and renewable energy generation such as solar panels, paying back the cost of their installation with savings on bills.

But the loans were too expensive, the scheme was frequently changed and householders did not take up the finance plans at the expected rate.

The latest figures up to June 2015, showed there were 9,999 “live” Green Deal plans, where all measures had been installed in a home, and a further 5,597 in process.

Tens of thousands of vouchers have been issued under the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund, with payments worth £114 million paid out to finance 27,140 measures. A total of £171 million has been committed under the fund.
Energy and Climate Change Secretary Amber Rudd said: “We are on the side of hardworking families and businesses – which is why we cannot continue to fund the Green Deal.

“It’s now time for the building industry and consumer groups to work with us to make new policy and build a system that works.

“Together we can achieve this Government’s ambition to make homes warmer and drive down bills for one million more homes by 2020 – and to do so at the best value for money for taxpayers.”

The Energy Company Obligation (ECO), which requires suppliers to provide energy saving measures to vulnerable and low-income households, with the money recouped on consumer bills, will continue this year.

Fuel poverty and environmental campaigners have called on the Government to make energy efficiency a national infrastructure priority, to help cut climate emissions, save money on their bills and improve health by stopping people living in damp, cold homes.

Julie Hirigoyen, chief executive of the UK Green Building Council, said the Government’s strategy for cutting high energy bills through energy saving measures such as insulation was now “dead in the water”.

“With each passing day, this Government puts an end to another green policy. Government’s strategy on dealing with high energy bills through home energy efficiency is now dead in the water.”

She said the Green Deal scheme was finally becoming established just as it was pulled.

“This is yet another announcement with no forewarning that will leave the energy efficiency industry battered and bruised.”

Ed Matthew, of the Energy Bill Revolution, said the Green Deal had clearly failed in its current form but should be reformed, not scrapped.

“The UK has among the worst-insulated homes in western Europe and as a result we waste huge amounts of energy.

“Zero interest loans to make homes energy efficient would be far more popular and could generate more tax revenue for the Treasury than it costs to subsidise.”

And he said: “The Government needs to make home energy efficiency an infrastructure priority.

“The Treasury plans to invest £100 billion in infrastructure over the next five years. Just a tiny proportion of this investment could help insulate millions of UK homes and drive down energy bills in the most cost-effective way.”

 

Greenpeace UK head of energy Daisy Sands said: “The Green Deal was far from being a success, but coming right after the scrapping of the zero-carbon homes target, this latest move suggests ministers are giving up on efficiency.

“This would be a false economy. Fixing our heat-leaking homes is a triple-win policy that can bring down bills, cut carbon emissions and reduce our dependence on energy imports.”

She added: ” If ministers really want to cut emissions at the lowest price for consumers, they can’t afford to ditch energy efficiency. A new ambitious programme for warmer homes is sorely needed.”

Consumer group Which? executive director Richard Lloyd said: ” We welcome this move as the Government can’t keep throwing money at a scheme that has spectacularly failed to take off.

“Ministers should now work with consumers to put together a realistic new approach that is genuinely good value and helps people to save money by saving energy.”

Shadow energy and climate change minister Jonathan Reynolds said: “The Green Deal was billed by the Government as ‘the biggest home improvement programme since the Second World War’ but has been a flop from start to finish.

“Today’s announcement simply serves to confirm that the Government’s approach to energy efficiency has been a complete and utter failure.”

He urged: ” With more than two million households in fuel poverty, the Government urgently needs to lay out what plans they have to replace the Green Deal.”

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron said: “Today’s news is yet another blow for green industry and British jobs. The Conservatives claim they want to tackle climate change but this is further evidence they don’t care about the environment.

“For five years we fought sceptical Tories to ensure we were the greenest government ever by investing billions in renewables and setting out ambitious climate change targets.

“By quietly dumping the Green Deal, David Cameron has yet again shown how little he cares about the future of the planet.”

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One Response to “How reporters spin – First article was edited replacement of second”

  1. stewgreen Says:

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